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left to make a deal before the country hits what's called the fiscal cliff. that's a combination of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospital and university and nonfor profit agency across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. so that's not a realistic option. >> reporter: but the president didn't say all this to speaker
up on the wealthiest americans, there will be no deal to avert going over the fiscal cliff. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: house republicans are adamant, no tax rate increases. >> we're willing to put revenues on the table. revenues that come from closing loopholes, getting rid of special interest deductions and not raising rates. >> reporter: but what the republicans are offering sounds a lot like what the president wanted during last year's budget showdown. >> give us $1.2 trillion in additional revenues, which could be accomplished without hiking tax rates by eliminating loopholes, eliminating some deductions. >> reporter: today, however, the president says those moves will not be enough. and the latest pew poll shows a lot of public pessimism. with 49% of the public saying they do not expect a deal to be struck by the deadline. 40%, a little more optimistic. george? >> sure looks like this will go right to the deadline. jake, thanks very much. >>> george, now, we're going to get
there will be no deal on the fiscal cliff unless both sides agree to raise rates on the wealthiest. that means raise tax rates for top earners. the reason that this is news is because there's been discussion publicly that perhaps they could find a rev new agreement where it would just involve capping deductions or maybe they could get to revenue just through tax reform, and with this piece of detail from that phone call yesterday, it would seem that the democrats, the president personally, is drawing a line saying those other ways are not enough. his campaign message that the top earners have to pay more, he is sticking to that line many these negotiations. >> jess, do we know how the republicans responded to this red line? >> well, speaker boehner was frustrated, wrovl, and came out with -- in his press conference today basically accusing the president of not leading on the issue. both sides are calling for the white house to come forward with spending cuts first, tell us where you are going to cut spending, before we, the republicans, will say whether we'll go along with you on tax rates. >> okay. the
dramatically higher interest rates because if they don't do a good deal for fiscal cliff and keep spending money, it's entirely possible this is going to be our come up -- >> the fed isn't big enough -- i thought i could count on rates below next year. >> i think demand is good. there will be a bit of inflation. people will be surprised. they ought to go get a mortgage now. they should be buying something now before that part of the economy heats up. housing stays strong. >> not europe. >> not europe. not asia. >> everyone is thinking about fiscal cliff. i have to go with i'm so worried about how many promises we've made in terms of $87 trillion of stuff we're not going to be able to afford and i am afraid we never, ever come to grips with it. >> that's why i think inflation is going to be an issue, joe, for exactly what you just said. kick the can does not last at 3% interest rates. it doesn't last. >> liesman is here. what's your -- he said if the jobless rate stays high is the biggest threat to 2013. why would the economy be bad? >> i'm worried about the long-term effect of joblessness
and the president until the fiscal cliff is avoided. unlikely, but a reflection of voter frustration as both sides dig in. the white house demanding higher tax rates for the top two tax brackets, and the republicans refusing. after rejecting the obama administration proposal last week, house republicans offered an outline for $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction, mostly through spending cuts. and while president obama would not answer questions about the counterproposal -- >> no deal better than a bad deal, sir? >> reporter: -- a senior white house official assailed it as a step backward, saying if republicans do not agree to some higher rates for wealthier taxpayer, the nation will go over the cliff, and the american people will hold the republicans responsible. wall street remains optimistic a deal will be struck. so the lack of progress is not yet resulted in a market plunge. but some economists estimate that because of the uncertainty posed by the fiscal cliff, at least 200,000 fewer jobs have been created this year. the official deadline is december 31st at midnight when the ball drops in times
and looking at the fiscal cliff and talking about raising taxes that will not put a dent in the spending, so what is the answer? >> gretchen: the suggestion i make let's go back to the programs we had five or six years ago. there was a safety net five or six years ago. if you lost your job in 2006, you got some help but not the type of help people have got since then. we go back to that situation and maybe we have a hope much having a labor market go back to the way it was five or six years ago. >> gretchen: professor which politician, republican or democrat is going to be doing what you just said? >> not the ones from my district. >> gretchen: i mean, they are in eight bind are they not? republicans and democrats are in a bind. will be the one to come to the podium and say let's stop those unemployment benefits. >> it is a bind and the europeans worked it out before . they found helping for the unemployed is politically popular and economically damaging and they did it for decade upon decade and continue to do it. and so yeah, i am not optmistic that we will go back to where we were five ye
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6